Wednesday, May 01, 2013

UKYA in May

MAY ALREADY! Four month of 2013 have already passed, how did that happen?!  Oh well, moving on ... May sees some incredible books published by British authors. I'm looking forward to reading so many of them. 

Look forward to seeing a guest post by Sophia Bennett amongst other things! Don't they all sound incredible?

Half Lives by Sara Grant (2nd May, Indigo)

Sara Grant's HALF LIVES is a dystopian chronicle of the journeys of two unlikely heroes in their race against time to save future generations.

Sara Grant

The Drowning by Rachel Ward (2nd May, Chicken House)

What happens if you've done something terrible? But you can't remember what. And you don't know how to put it right ...When Carl opens his eyes on the banks of a lake, his brother is being zipped into a body bag. What happened in the water? He can't remember And when he glimpses A beautiful girl he thinks he recognizes, she runs away.Suddenly he knows he must find her - because together they must face the truth before it drowns them.

Rachel Ward 

You Don't Know Me by Sophia Bennett (2nd May, Chicken House)

It was all so good. Sasha and Rose. Best friends in a band, singing together. Right up to the finals of Killer Act when the judges tell them one of them must go Suddenly their friendship is put to the ultimate test. On TV in front of millions. Two girls. One huge mistake. Can they ever forgive each other?

Sophia Bennett

Firewallers by Simon Packham (30 May, Piccadilly)

Can her life get any worse? Jess returns from a nightmare day at school to find her dad's suspended from work and gone into hiding. To escape the slobbering newshounds all eager for the full story, Mum drags Jess and her sister off to a remote Scottish Island. Modern technology's forbidden, and there's only a bunch of teenage uber geeks for company. Without Facebook or even her mobile, Jess feels totally disconnected from everybody back home. And why are they there anyway? What are they really running away from?

Simon Packham

Monkey Wars by Richard Kurti (2nd May, Walker)

When the Langur monkey troop rises to power on the dusty streets of Calcutta, it is at a price. A brutal massacre drives the Rhesus troop out of the place they called home and forces them to embark on a dangerous journey. But one Langur monkey, Mico, is prepared to stand up to the tyrannical Langur regime and fight for truth, friendship and love. As Mico uncovers the secrets and lies at the heart of the corrupt Langur leadership, he quickly realizes he is playing a dangerous game. And when monkeys turn on each other, there can be no survivors...

Richard Kurti 

Follow Me Down by Tanya Byrne (9th May, Headline)

When sixteen-year old Adamma Okonma, a Nigerian diplomat's daughter, arrives at exclusive Croften College in Wiltshire, she is immediately drawn to beautiful, impetuous, unpredictable Scarlett Milton. Adamma and Scarlett become inseperable - until Adamma falls for Scarlett's boyfriend Dominic. Soon the battle lines are drawn and Adamma is shunned by Scarlett and her priviledged peers. But then Scarlett goes missing and everything takes a darker turn. As Adamma begins to uncover a series of ugly scandals at the school, she realises there was more than one person who wanted Scarlett to disappear and indeed that Croften has its own disturbing secrets to hide...

Tanya Byrne

Kite Spirit by Sita Brahmachari (9th May, Macmillan)

During the summer of her GCSEs Kite's world falls apart. Her best friend, Dawn, commits suicide after a long struggle with feeling under pressure to achieve. Kite's dad takes her to the Lake District, to give her time and space to grieve. In London Kite is a confident girl, at home in the noisy, bustling city, but in the countryside she feels vulnerable and disorientated. Kite senses Dawn's spirit around her and is consumed by powerful, confusing emotions - anger, guilt, sadness and frustration, all of which are locked inside. It's not until she meets local boy, Garth, that Kite begins to open up - talking to a stranger is easier somehow. Kite deeply misses her friend and would do anything to speak to Dawn just once more, to understand why . . . Otherwise how can she ever say goodbye? A potent story about grief, friendship, acceptance and making your heart whole again.

Sita Brahmachari

The Child's Elephant by Rachel Campbell-Johnston (2nd May, David Fickling Books)

When Bat, a young African herd-boy, stumbles upon an orphaned baby elephant, he takes her home and pledges to look after her. As Meya grows and learns, she becomes part of Bat's family, and is soon the joy of the entire village. But she can't stay with Bat for ever - she belongs to the wild, and with Bat's help she joins an elephant herd, roaming free on the plains.

Bat returns to the gentle, peaceful rhythms of village life. But everything he knows is shattered when he and his best friend Muka are kidnapped and forced into the child army. They witness horrors and experience cruelties they never thought possible.

Now it is time for Meya to rescue Bat, but even together, are they strong enough to find their way home through the harsh African savannah?

Rachel Campbell-Johnston

The Bone Dragon by Alexia Casale (2nd May, Faber)

Evie's shattered ribs have been a secret for the last four years. Now she has found the strength to tell her adoptive parents, and the physical traces of her past are fixed - the only remaining signs a scar on her side and a fragment of bone taken home from the hospital, which her uncle Ben helps her to carve into a dragon as a sign of her strength.

Soon this ivory talisman begins to come to life at night, offering wisdom and encouragement in roaming dreams of smoke and moonlight that come to feel ever more real.

As Evie grows stronger there remains one problem her new parents can't fix for her: a revenge that must be taken. And it seems that the Dragon is the one to take it.

This subtly unsettling novel is told from the viewpoint of a fourteen-year-old girl damaged by a past she can't talk about, in a hypnotic narrative that, while giving increasing insight, also becomes increasingly unreliable.

A blend of psychological thriller and fairytale, The Bone Dragon explores the fragile boundaries between real life and fantasy, and the darkest corners of the human mind.

Alexia Casale 

The Disgrace of Kitty Grey by Mary Hooper (9th May, Bloomsbury)

Kitty is living a happy, carefree life as a dairymaid in the countryside. The grand family she is employed by looks after her well, and she loves her trade, caring for the gentle cows and working in the cool, calm dairy. And then, of course, there is Will, the river man who she thinks is very fond of her, and indeed she is of him. Surely he will ask her to marry him soon? Then one day disaster strikes: Will disappears. Kitty is first worried and then furious. She fears that Will has only been leading her on all this time, and has now gone to London to make his fortune, forgetting about her completely. 

So when Kitty is asked to go to London to pick up a copy of Pride and Prejudice, the latest novel by the very fashionable Jane Austen, Kitty leaps at the chance to track down Will. But Kitty has no idea how vast London is, and how careful she must be. It is barely a moment before eagle-eyed pickpockets have spotted the country-born-and-bred Kitty and relieved her of her money and belongings. Dauntingly fast, she has lost her only means of returning home and must face the terrifying prospect of stealing in order to survive - and of being named a thief ...

Mary Hooper

Everything Is Fine (and other lies I tell myself) by Cathy Brett (9th May, Headline)

Things haven't been going so well for fifteen-year-old Esther Armstrong. With her brother Max - her closest ally - absent, she's forced to face everything alone, not least her parents' heated arguments. As the summer holidays stretch endlessly ahead, she's desperate for something, anything, to divert her attention.

Then she finds some letters hidden in the walls of her family home, sent by a soldier to his sweetheart from the trenches of WWI. Esther is consumed by the mystery of these lovers - not very much older than herself - and what became of them. Perhaps in piecing together the jigsaw of someone else's life, Esther can work out how to reassemble her own, and how to make everything fine again...

This is a novel about growing up, moving on and the strength of a family.

Cathy Brett

Paper Aeroplanes by Dawn O'Porter (2nd May, Hot Key Books)

It's the mid-1990s, and fifteen year-old Guernsey schoolgirls, Renée and Flo, are not really meant to be friends. Thoughtful, introspective and studious Flo couldn't be more different to ambitious, extroverted and sexually curious Renée. But Renée and Flo are united by loneliness and their dysfunctional families, and an intense bond is formed. Although there are obstacles to their friendship (namely Flo's jealous ex-best friend and Renée's growing infatuation with Flo's brother), fifteen is an age where anything can happen, where life stretches out before you, and when every betrayal feels like the end of the world. For Renée and Flo it is the time of their lives.

With graphic content and some scenes of a sexual nature, PAPER AEROPLANES is a gritty, poignant, often laugh-out-loud funny and powerful novel. It is an unforgettable snapshot of small-town adolescence and the heart-stopping power of female friendship.

Dawn O'Porter

 Which of these books being published this month are you most looking forward to reading?


  1. You don't know me, everything is fine and paper aeroplanes are all really good :)

    1. That's wonderful to hear, Maya! I've only read You Don't Know Me and Follow Me Down from this list so far but I have so many others on my pile waiting to be read. It'll be lovely when I'm finally better caught up with everything!

  2. Currently reading You Don't Know Me which is really good, and am really intrigued by Paper Areoplanes :)

    1. I only just finished You Don't Know Me last night. It is SO GOOD!


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